Author Topic: s/s braid in boiler  (Read 10850 times)

KernelCrush

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Re: s/s braid in boiler
« Reply #15 on: February 23, 2013, 04:21:54 PM »
Quote
The end of the braid has one of those s/s racking tube screens on it.

It looks factory made.  Where did you get the ss racking tube screen?  Super good fit with no clamp.  I use a ss end plug adding to the weight.  It ended up like an anvil.  Worked good with whole hop but way too heavy. 


Offline MaltLicker

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Re: s/s braid in boiler
« Reply #17 on: March 03, 2013, 06:26:18 PM »


The new scrubby worked well, and the elbow pointed downward held it in place and lower than just tying it to the nipple threads. 

I could see clearly through the last dregs of the wort that went into the hydro tube. 

Offline Curly55

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Re: s/s braid in boiler
« Reply #18 on: March 03, 2013, 10:03:37 PM »
Looks like it worked. And as long as you're happy with it that's what matters. Cheers
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Offline mbg-bs

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Re: s/s braid in boiler
« Reply #19 on: March 04, 2013, 06:57:33 AM »
I enjoyed reading this thread, but, have some questions. I can see using a braid/scrubby/slit pipe in the boiler to prevent larger stuff like leaf hops from stopping the flow when draining the wort but do these devices really hold back trub and cold break? I had a copper tube with saw kerf cuts and it stopped nothing (I do use a hop bag) so just this weekend I modified it to be an open tube like the Blichmann uses.

As a side note - I brewed this weekend and watched the keggle as it was almost done draining and noticed there wasn't a pile of trub in the center of the pot even though I whirl-pooled it well and let it sit for a good 30 minutes. I also noticed that the cold break was what I call in solution with some good wort so I can't see how you can avoid cold break material in the primary without sacrificing quite a bit of good wort. If a scrubby works on cold break I'm up for a try.

Thanks,

Mike

KernelCrush

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Re: s/s braid in boiler
« Reply #20 on: March 04, 2013, 09:46:15 AM »
During the boil I extend my drain past my normal expected trub level.  My elbow can be turned lower as the wort level drops so I can get almost all the wort and little break.  When it settles.

Offline mbg-bs

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Re: s/s braid in boiler
« Reply #21 on: March 04, 2013, 10:33:53 AM »
During the boil I extend my drain past my normal expected trub level.  My elbow can be turned lower as the wort level drops so I can get almost all the wort and little break.  When it settles.

Can you share how you piped it such that you can turn the tube.

Thanks

KernelCrush

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Re: s/s braid in boiler
« Reply #22 on: March 04, 2013, 10:58:18 AM »
Its a ss elbow that screws into the kettle ball valve fitting, topped with union & a coupler.  I tighten that till its just barely finger tight.  It stands straight up at that point.  as the wort level drops I turn the whole assembly sideways by pushing with sanitized spoon to lower the effective level of the drain. 

Offline mbg-bs

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Re: s/s braid in boiler
« Reply #23 on: March 04, 2013, 12:31:09 PM »
Its a ss elbow that screws into the kettle ball valve fitting, topped with union & a coupler.  I tighten that till its just barely finger tight.  It stands straight up at that point.  as the wort level drops I turn the whole assembly sideways by pushing with sanitized spoon to lower the effective level of the drain.

Ahhh - I thought you did it from the outside somehow like I think I have seen on a conical fermentor.

Thanks

Offline Curly55

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Re: s/s braid in boiler
« Reply #24 on: March 04, 2013, 03:26:06 PM »
On many of your statements you are correct. I do leave quit a bit of "good" wort behind (.9 gallons to be exact) but it is a very small price to pay on the homebrew scale for good clear wort. The whole hops do get left behind but this is what filters my wort on its way to the carboy. Now keep in mind I only use whole hops, an immersion chiller, and I let everything settle for 15-20 min after chilling, before I drain the kettle, to let the hops form a make shift filter bed. You know kind of like a hop back would do, only in the kettle it's self.
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Offline MaltLicker

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Re: s/s braid in boiler
« Reply #25 on: March 04, 2013, 04:29:18 PM »
I can see using a braid/scrubby/slit pipe in the boiler to prevent larger stuff like leaf hops from stopping the flow when draining the wort but do these devices really hold back trub and cold break? ...............If a scrubby works on cold break I'm up for a try.  Mike


I do much the same as Curly55 described, and sacrifice some brewhouse EE% (wort) to keep the fermentor more clear.   The new scrubby and elbow do a great job as the hops gradually fill the scrubby and keep most gunk out.  I usually put a fine nylon mesh bag on the carboy to catch the first hop bits. 

I built the braid before I found online that the braids do not work well in the boiler with pellets, which I normally use.  I have some leaf hops to use, however, and may try it with them.   I also want to try the braid in the MLT to get back the wasted space under the false bottom, perhaps on bigger beer where I need the space for grains.

KernelCrush

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Re: s/s braid in boiler
« Reply #26 on: March 05, 2013, 05:36:19 AM »
When using whole hops and a CFC you will have a lot less trub in the kettle to deal with. 

Offline crabbs

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Re: s/s braid in boiler
« Reply #27 on: March 12, 2013, 04:35:14 PM »
I tried the braid ,and found that it kinks easily.I am currently using with great success what some refer to as the" hop taco".(there is online info on that phrase)you can get the parts at mcmaster carr .I bought a stainless steel colander from bed bath beyond less than 20bucks. I then cut the stainless from the rim, folded it over,then stitched it closed except for a small area to sleeve over the spiggot nipple to drain. bought a roll of stainless steel jewelry wire for stitching from the local craft store for about 2bucks. two years old and going strong,rinses with a hose easily it is somewhat rigid,did stick the fingers a few times while stitching but it was worth it