Author Topic: 2 types of yeast?  (Read 2304 times)

Offline a_darb

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2 types of yeast?
« on: September 26, 2012, 05:21:53 PM »
Hello,
I'm new to brewing and have had 2 successful batches. I found a recipe on this site that I'm thinking of using. The recipe calls for 2 types of yeast. 0.5 of British Ale and East Coast Ale White labs. Why would you use two kinds of yeast in the same batch? Thanks for answering my question!

-Darb

Offline tom_hampton

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Re: 2 types of yeast?
« Reply #1 on: September 26, 2012, 09:20:16 PM »
Lots of reasons to use multiple strains.  Flavor profile, attenuation, any reason you might want the best of one yeast and balance out the negatives of another. 

I just finished a batch of pumpkin ale using British Ale.  It is HIGHLY flocculant, but a little more attenuative than WLP002.  The beer tastes very good, even still flat from the fermenter.  I may replace WLP002 with this yeast.  It was finished and clear in 10 days. 

I haven't used East Coast ale.  From the white labs page: its less attenuative than CalAle, and even less flocculant. Its listed as having a similar flavor profile.

Based on the above, I don't really know why I would blend these two yeasts.   I don't really see how East Coast compliments '008.  Besides, I don't like low flocculant yeasts other than heffe.

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On Tap: Apfelwein, Kolsch(v2), Pumpkin Ale, Belgian Specialty 
Aging/Storing: Coffee Porter, Chocolate Porter, Flanders Red, English Barlywine
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