Author Topic: Off Fruity Flavour  (Read 4797 times)

4x

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Off Fruity Flavour
« on: November 27, 2004, 11:49:59 AM »
I live on the coast of central Queensland > tropical.
One of the things that I have been noticing is that a few brews have a fermented fruit flavour to then.
Where is this coming from?
I cold condition 22lts in two 15lt carboys, one with 15lts the other  with 7lts. Would the head space be causing the off fruity flavours?
I have sampled the beer in question at room temp >22c-25c and the flavours are very pronounced, then recap, chill and find the flavour a little masked. Since I don't make a habit of drinking my beer hot (so no smart comments) and want to eliminate  this flavour all together where do I need start looking for the culprit?

4x
>:( >:(

Offline bonjour

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Re: Off Fruity Flavour
« Reply #1 on: November 27, 2004, 01:53:13 PM »
I have 22-25C being 71.6-77F.  This is a warm ferment (especially the 25C) that will develop fruity flavors.  I would suggest finding a way to maintain 21C and under for the WORT temp (not room temp) to eliminate the fruity flavors.  

The head space should not be causing any problem as long as there is a CO2 blanket on the wort.  If the wort is oxidizing you get a sherry like fruity aroma and taste.

Fred Bonjour

4x

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Re: Off Fruity Flavour
« Reply #2 on: December 30, 2004, 12:28:47 PM »
  Hi bonjour,
Thanks for your help on this one.
Since I posted this I was at the point of tipping this whole brew out three salbs of beer(60 or so stubbies) I was saved from this by a new bottle shop opening up in Mackay that has a good range of imported beers. So happened to buy a Chek Pilsener, guess what? just the same flavour as what I had brewed justa stronger flavour .
This little experience has changed my whole thinking on brewing
1. If you are going to brew certain styles you need to have a benchmark to compair it with > buy a Chek Pilsener and try it
2. I Don't care if my brews don't taste like the commercial stuff, What matters to me is whether I like it or not.
The beer in question was brewed from a tin of MORGANS AUSY pilsener .I'm happy with the result, now that I know what it should taste like and will be brewing it again

4X

Cosh

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Re: Off Fruity Flavour
« Reply #3 on: January 01, 2005, 03:20:01 PM »
This is kinda off topic, but it was mentioned, so I'd like to ask...

I just had a marvelous bottle of Belgian Brown ale.  Liefmans Goudenband.  There were (as noted above) some sherry-like flavours to the beer, and the pub manager suggested that it was purposeful oxidation of the wort.

Any ideas as to duplicating this process at home...without subjecting the wort to the local nasties that would not positively affect the taste of the beer?

The ale was absolutely delicious and I have had some good luck with Beligian-style ales.  Any thoughts?

Mike

Offline bonjour

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Re: Off Fruity Flavour
« Reply #4 on: January 01, 2005, 04:15:24 PM »
Quote
This is kinda off topic, but it was mentioned, so I'd like to ask...

I just had a marvelous bottle of Belgian Brown ale.  Liefmans Goudenband.  There were (as noted above) some sherry-like flavours to the beer, and the pub manager suggested that it was purposeful oxidation of the wort.

Any ideas as to duplicating this process at home...without subjecting the wort to the local nasties that would not positively affect the taste of the beer?

The ale was absolutely delicious and I have had some good luck with Beligian-style ales.  Any thoughts?

Mike

The Oxidation Sherry notes frequently come with time on big beers. Belgians are frequently well aged.  Was the beer corked?  That could also contribute.

Wait a year, seriously.  8-9 months minimum.

Fred

4x

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Re: Off Fruity Flavour
« Reply #5 on: January 02, 2005, 01:55:02 PM »
Hi,
Just a quick thought. Look into the speciality yeast for  Belgian ale as they have a mixture of other bacteria in these yeast to produce certain flavours of some  Belgian ales. Have a look at this page it might give you some ideas as well
http://www.brewingtechniques.com/library/backissues/issue1.2/studach.html

Cosh

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Re: Off Fruity Flavour
« Reply #6 on: January 04, 2005, 03:08:56 PM »
4x-

(the link above contained some good advice on blending as well)

You have no idea how timely your advice is...this weekend we had a corny half keg of std brown ale...a little bland.  We added a small amount of some 4yr old barley wine, and BAM!  a real winner.  Thanks for the link.

Mike