Author Topic: Re: Kegging  (Read 4390 times)

Offline cmbrougham

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Re: Kegging
« on: November 03, 2004, 11:08:04 AM »
What kind of problems are you having with the cornies that makes you want to give them up? There isn't much to them to go wrong, IMO--at least, a lot less to go wrong than with Sanke kegs.

Offline littlebrew

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Re: Kegging
« Reply #1 on: November 03, 2004, 11:28:46 AM »
They have been much like the flu cold...you get the problem and after awhile the problem(s) go away.  They were purchased from my favorite supplier and almost immediately the p/u tube developed a hole,  believe it or not, all but one gasket, the seats,  & one  pressure relief...and you'd think that was all.  

Tonight, I went to tap a new batch (Mississippi IPA) and it had gone flat...AND spoiled!!! Another bad seat.  I suppose I am a bit impatient when it comes to these things, but I really get PO'ed when somthing happens to my brew!!  ;D ;D

All repalcement parts were appropriate types and replaced carefully...Maybe just a run of bad luck!  
We are what we repeatedly do.  Excellence then, is not an act, but a habit........Aristotle

Offline cmbrougham

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Re: Kegging
« Reply #2 on: November 03, 2004, 11:46:16 AM »
Huh... interesting. I haven't had any problems with mine. I guess the only thing I can say is that gaskets are cheap, and I'd definitely try those again before giving up on cornies. From what I've heard, Sankes are pretty difficult to deal with, though not impossible. I can't offer any advice on how to work with them, unfortunately.

ttreml3

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Re: Kegging
« Reply #3 on: November 03, 2004, 01:23:31 PM »
It does sound like you're having an incredible stroke of bad luck.  I do know sometimes reconditioned kegs have the wrong posts put on them for the type, and then replacing a poppit for the keg doesn't fit the post.  

(does that even make sense?)

I've got 4 kegs, one leaks through the gas, and another leaks through the beer.  I know which they are and just keep a gas line on the one and a beer line on the other.  I consider it a work around, instead of a solution.
just my $0.02

Offline littlebrew

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Re: Kegging
« Reply #4 on: November 03, 2004, 11:30:43 PM »
Thanks for the advise.  Just like the brewing...I must have patience!!! ;)
We are what we repeatedly do.  Excellence then, is not an act, but a habit........Aristotle

brewzoo

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Re: Kegging
« Reply #5 on: November 04, 2004, 07:43:53 AM »
Hi,

I have been using a combination of cornie and sanke. My taps are all setup with cornies. I usually brew 30-40 gallon batches. So I fill a couple of cornies and the rest goes into a 15 gal sanke. The sanke is then used to re-fill the cornies as needed. Everything stays sealed and under pressure.

Works GREAT. But I have to say that putting a sanke back together takes practice. That snap ring can be a real pain. I did see a simple snap ring on one of the brew supplyer sites that has little holes in the end so you can use snap ring plyers. Have not tryed this but probably will in the near future.

As for the cornies. I have only had one give me problems. Usually if you just get the seal wet or re-adjust it they seal up.

Hope this helps.

Brew On.

 

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