Author Topic: Higher ABV than desired  (Read 1132 times)

Offline x3la

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Re: Higher ABV than desired
« Reply #15 on: July 17, 2020, 11:18:32 AM »
What purpose does reducing the mash temperature over the 90 minutes from 160F to 148F serve?

Offline Oginme

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Re: Higher ABV than desired
« Reply #16 on: July 17, 2020, 12:07:45 PM »
As I read that it would seem that 160F water is the strike temperature of the water before the grains are mixed in.  My interpretation is that once mixed with the grains, the mashing temperature is at 148F. 

There have been some people interested in or trying to do a reverse temperature mash: starting out at a temperature high in the fermentation zone which favors alpha amylase activity and then cooling the wort down to a rest in the lower range which favors beta amylase activity.  While this seems to be reasonable in thought, the higher rest temperature hastens the denaturing of the beta amylase enzyme which if left for too long at the higher temperature will leave less enzyme available when the rest temperature is lowered to the range for that enzyme to optimally operate.

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Offline x3la

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Re: Higher ABV than desired
« Reply #17 on: July 18, 2020, 11:39:36 AM »
If this is what the brewery did then I think this has to be my next experiment.

Ringwood was my local brewery in the UK, founded by Peter Austin. I grew up drinking their beers and am particularly fond of their Best Bitter. Now that I live in the US I'm trying to replicate the beers that I miss. 20 litre Polypins for now until I've honed each recipe.

Offline brewfun

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Re: Higher ABV than desired
« Reply #18 on: July 20, 2020, 09:21:43 AM »
What mash temp do you target for English Ales?

Depends on the malt being used. US domestic malts handle a higher temperature (158 - 162 F), while heritage and import grains seem to work with lower temps (154 - 156 F). A lot has to do with protein levels and retained enzymes. Heritage grains like Maris Otter and Golden Promise have lower diastatic values than American or Canadian two row. At temperatures of 148 - 154, both categories can handle up to 50% adjunct and specialty malts, but heritage malts quickly fall off at higher temps.

Having seen some Peter Austin recipes, I'd wager that the mash was about 151 to 154, with up to 5% of light crystal (10 to 20 lov) and another 5% of flaked barley for body. Don't underestimate the contribution of yeast to low gravity cask ale. The Yorkshire Square (wlp037) is going to give fantastic flavor up to 4%, but falls off above that. The British Ale (wlp002) is going to be a lot drier and higher abv under the same conditions, so there's where the higher mash and additional sugar make the difference.

Peter Austin was fond of open fermentation and top cropping yeast and most of his installations included that. Peter Austin had Ringwood yeast he incorporated into many of his breweries. Interestingly, the current commercial strains of Ringwood are high flocculators, rather than true top cropping. So, I don't know the evolution of that strain or if it ever was top cropping.
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