Author Topic: US-05 Fermentation  (Read 364 times)

Offline lynch140

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US-05 Fermentation
« on: November 07, 2019, 02:00:48 AM »
I have brewed a red ale and fermented using US-05 in my cellar at 18C.

There was no air lock activity nor that much krausen on top yet after six days it has reduced in gravity from 1056 to 1012.

Consider the lack of signs should it still be ok, i would be worried oxygen was getting in somewhere (i did open the air lock for a few second about 3 times over the 6 days to check the krausen)

I plan to dry hop it today

Offline Oginme

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Re: US-05 Fermentation
« Reply #1 on: November 07, 2019, 02:40:43 AM »
Airlock activity is a poor sign of fermentation, IMHO.  You may not have had your bucket/carboy/fermentation vessel sealed well and the escaping CO2 forced its way out the easiest path (i.e. not the airlock). 

You took a sample to test gravity, how did that taste?  I highly recommend tasting your samples as you go as it helps you to identify off flavors sooner and learn how the flavors develop through the fermentation/maturation of the beer.  It is a great learning experience.

So, if the beer tastes OK you will be fine.
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Offline lynch140

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Re: US-05 Fermentation
« Reply #2 on: November 07, 2019, 03:39:45 AM »
Yes I have tasted it to me the beer tastes ok so far

Offline lynch140

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Re: US-05 Fermentation
« Reply #3 on: November 07, 2019, 06:44:09 AM »
However if C02 is escaping somewhere thats means oxygen may be getting in also which for the future could be an issue?

Offline Kevin58

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Re: US-05 Fermentation
« Reply #4 on: November 07, 2019, 07:04:57 AM »
Ever heard of open fermentation?

https://youtu.be/xClXKMhcFr0
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Offline Oginme

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Re: US-05 Fermentation
« Reply #5 on: November 07, 2019, 07:11:41 AM »
For active fermentation, the release of CO2 will keep Oxygen from entering your fermentation vessel.  When that slows down, the chances of Oxygen entering unless it is a large opening is rather small.  Generally, there needs to be a driving force of which the concentration of O2 outside the vessel and lack of O2 inside the vessel is very minor.  What can induce more O2 egress into the vessel would be large temperature swings, cold crashing, or opening up the vessel frequently to add or remove contents.  On the home brew level, there will almost always be some cold side Oxygen exposure unless you have a really well sealed system.  The chances of it affecting the shelf life and flavors of the beer is dependent upon the amount of the exposure.

From my personal experience, I don't do anything extraordinary to protect my finished beer from oxygen exposure during bottling.  I do try to avoid splashing and mixing of my beer.  While I cannot say that there is not some affect on the flavor of aged beers, I have had Munich Pilsners take medals at 10 months in the bottle with no comment about oxidation or flavors related to such. 
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Offline Eric19312

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Re: US-05 Fermentation
« Reply #6 on: November 15, 2019, 03:12:57 PM »
Sounds like you made beer and it's probably done.  I'd get to bottling or kegging soon.  All this opening and checking on it is bad for the beer.