Author Topic: Body  (Read 745 times)

Offline solidute

  • BeerSmith Apprentice Brewer
  • **
  • Posts: 15
  • BeerSmith 2 Rocks!
Body
« on: November 03, 2019, 04:27:20 PM »
Anyone else having constant feedback about lack of body from their biab beers?

Oats, carapils, oats and carapils... mash temps.... none of those things are helping me just cant get much if any body in my beers.

Any suggestions?
Cheers

Offline Oginme

  • BeerSmith Grandmaster Brewer
  • *****
  • Posts: 2552
  • Goats, guitars, and a home brew; Life is good!
    • Longvu LaManchas
Re: Body
« Reply #1 on: November 03, 2019, 06:03:54 PM »
What are your mash temperatures?  What are you getting for mash efficiency?
Recycle your grains, feed them to a goat!

Offline BOB357

  • BeerSmith Grandmaster Brewer
  • *****
  • Posts: 435
  • Beer is my bucket list!
Re: Body
« Reply #2 on: November 03, 2019, 06:20:38 PM »
Oginme asks a couple of questions than may well narrow down the answer to your dilemma. I would also suggest that using a lower attenuating yeast strain would increase body.
Bob

Offline solidute

  • BeerSmith Apprentice Brewer
  • **
  • Posts: 15
  • BeerSmith 2 Rocks!
Re: Body
« Reply #3 on: November 03, 2019, 06:45:09 PM »
Mash temps I've tried 68?c down to 65?c beersmith has these at full body and medium body respectively. Efficiency is around the 70% mark sometimes higher and sometimes lower

Mostly using us05 but have used us04, bry97 and mangrove jacks m44, the 04 was for an esb.

Theoretically,  from what I've been able to research, I should be good. Just cant figure it out

Offline BOB357

  • BeerSmith Grandmaster Brewer
  • *****
  • Posts: 435
  • Beer is my bucket list!
Re: Body
« Reply #4 on: November 03, 2019, 08:04:12 PM »
65C would be properly defined as a mash temperature for a light bodied beer, and 65C for more of a medium body, though the difference might be difficult to tell with many of todays highly modified base malts. US-05 and M44 are both high attenuators, with BRY-97 following close behind. When I want a fuller bodied beer I go with Mangrove Jack's Empire Ale. I can almost always depend on 67% attenuation with little residual sweetness and fairly low esters in most styles. Another consideration could be your water.

Bob

Offline solidute

  • BeerSmith Apprentice Brewer
  • **
  • Posts: 15
  • BeerSmith 2 Rocks!
Re: Body
« Reply #5 on: November 03, 2019, 10:00:41 PM »
Water could be something. Never used to adjust it, now i adjust to what beersmith says. Hasn't made any difference apparently 🤷‍♂️

Offline Oginme

  • BeerSmith Grandmaster Brewer
  • *****
  • Posts: 2552
  • Goats, guitars, and a home brew; Life is good!
    • Longvu LaManchas
Re: Body
« Reply #6 on: November 04, 2019, 05:39:01 AM »
I would not focus on water being a primary issue.  First thing to check is to make sure your thermometer is calibrated.  You can do this by sticking it in ice with a little water to to get a freezing point of 0C and then in boiling water to get a 100C reading.  A few tenths off is not a big deal, but a few degrees may be a larger issue when it comes to mashing.

65C to 68C is the lower to middle range of the activity range for the amylase enzymes needed to reduce the starches into fermentable sugars.  If you are reading higher than actual, it would mean that you are actually in the lower range of activity which favors higher fermentability and therefore greater attenuation of the wort.

I guess the next question is where are some of your recipes starting out for OG and where do they finish for FG?  Please be specific and give several examples.  Are you using any simple sugars in your recipes? 

You give your efficiency as around 70%, this is for mash efficiency?  or is that the brew house efficiency?  Since brew house efficiency has other process losses, it really does not tell us anything, but your mash efficiency will tell us how well you are converting and removing the sugars from the grist.  Too high of a mash/lauter efficiency can sometimes give you higher fermentable wort, though this is more common with over sparging than with a full volume BIAB.

Lastly, from where and who are you getting the feedback on the low body?  How do you feel about the body of your beers?  Do they meet your expectation or are they thin and watery to you?
Recycle your grains, feed them to a goat!

Offline solidute

  • BeerSmith Apprentice Brewer
  • **
  • Posts: 15
  • BeerSmith 2 Rocks!
Re: Body
« Reply #7 on: November 04, 2019, 03:55:42 PM »

I would not focus on water being a primary issue.  First thing to check is to make sure your thermometer is calibrated.  You can do this by sticking it in ice with a little water to to get a freezing point of 0C and then in boiling water to get a 100C reading.  A few tenths off is not a big deal, but a few degrees may be a larger issue when it comes to mashing.
Havent calibrated it no. but i will get onto this today

65C to 68C is the lower to middle range of the activity range for the amylase enzymes needed to reduce the starches into fermentable sugars.  If you are reading higher than actual, it would mean that you are actually in the lower range of activity which favors higher fermentability and therefore greater attenuation of the wort.
OK. im using the temp range as per beersmith, actual mash temps according to beersmith program are 68.9 for full body and 66.7 for medium body. again i'll check that thermometer and see how accurate it is

I guess the next question is where are some of your recipes starting out for OG and where do they finish for FG?  Please be specific and give several examples.  Are you using any simple sugars in your recipes? 
i will get some examples and put them in a new post. no simple sugars, grain only

You give your efficiency as around 70%, this is for mash efficiency?  or is that the brew house efficiency?  Since brew house efficiency has other process losses, it really does not tell us anything, but your mash efficiency will tell us how well you are converting and removing the sugars from the grist.  Too high of a mash/lauter efficiency can sometimes give you higher fermentable wort, though this is more common with over sparging than with a full volume BIAB.
yes mash efficiency.

Lastly, from where and who are you getting the feedback on the low body?  How do you feel about the body of your beers?  Do they meet your expectation or are they thin and watery to you?
ok so low body feedback is from, mates with 20 plus years of experience brewing, 2 pro brewers, and homebrew comp judging notes. i agree with the feedback as i would like a fuller bodied beer but just cant get there

Offline solidute

  • BeerSmith Apprentice Brewer
  • **
  • Posts: 15
  • BeerSmith 2 Rocks!
Re: Body
« Reply #8 on: November 04, 2019, 04:04:33 PM »
some examples of OG/FG of a number of my brews