Author Topic: Rose` Recipes  (Read 731 times)

Offline makemorebeer

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Rose` Recipes
« on: November 09, 2018, 08:03:33 AM »
Recently my wife got a Rose` beer from.....i honestly don't remember.  sorry.  Anyway she wanted me to take a crack at a Rose` beer.  Sadly i'm not finding any information, recipes, or details on how to do this and what types of beer styles it would go well in.  so i'm turning to you fine folks for Wisdom guidance and an inevitable recipe formulation. 

Style:  I was thinking a blonde Ale would be best since it'll showcase the red color it should come out as, as well as having a milder, less hoppy taste

adding it?  that's the question,   is this an actual Rose` wine being added?  if it is how do you compensate for both the alcohol content of the wine and the sugar content since the Yeasts would go to town on that. 

Finally, what type of yeast would best  be used for this purpose.  i'd probably just use a basic Ale yeast ( i lean towards wyeast labs, so American I probably)

Thanks for the help.  i'm hoping to get this put together by christmas, but i'm probably too late for that.

Offline ochiburi

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Re: Rose` Recipes
« Reply #1 on: November 16, 2018, 08:35:53 AM »
If you want a beer/wine style, try mixing some of your beer with a small glass of Ros? to establish proportions and get an idea of taste.  I have tasted some beer matured in white wine barrels with fresh wine added - it was not exactly my cup of tea, but very different.

Most people trying to make a pink beer (as opposed to a beer/wine mix) use red fruit or veg to colour it. You could for example use Hibiscus flowers, strawberries, beetroots, etc. Lots of recipes on beersmith with those ingredients.

Offline makemorebeer

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Re: Rose` Recipes
« Reply #2 on: November 21, 2018, 06:54:37 AM »
I figured out by my wife reminding me of where we got this beer.  it's surly rose` lager.  which naturally presents many problems.  First it uses currants which appear to be all but unavailable in the US.  second it's a lager which i'm not equipped yet to do.  finally it uses a yeast blend which I've never done before but doubt is 33% of each of the three yeasts.  so i'm thinking of ways to make this into an ale with similar results.  the details I found were from surleys website here...

https://surlybrewing.com/beer/rose/

Any ideas?

Online Oginme

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Re: Rose` Recipes
« Reply #3 on: November 21, 2018, 08:01:29 AM »
Let's tackle these one issue at a time:

Yeast:  If you can control temperature at the beginning of the fermentation down to 55F to 60F, try a "hybrid" yeast such as California Lager (WY2112) or try a very clean ale yeast such as German Ale (WY1007) fermented at low temperatures.  White Labs has these strains as well, but I am unfamiliar with them.  I am pretty sure they use the champagne yeast to finish the beer to make sure it is very dry.  Since the final gravity (from plato and %ABV) is just a hair over 1.000, it is probably added as a secondary fermentation to eat up any maltotriose in the wort. 

Currants:  Dried currants are readily available on Amazon.  My LHBS has them as well for the wine makers

The grain bill ingredients look pretty straight forward and it may be worth emailing the brewers at Surly and asking them nicely for some help with the relative percentages and how and when to add the currants and strawberries.  I was at Surly a little over a month ago and found the people there very talkative and helpful.

Process:  Given the low ending gravity, you would probably do well to mash long and low (145F to 148F) and give the enzymes as much of a chance to break down the starches and then step up to 156F to 158F to allow the a-amylase to cut up any longer chains which may be left.  I would aim lower in the pH range (5.0 to 5.2) as this seems to give me crisper, dryer finish to my beers.  You may also find that a beta-glucan rest at 105F to 110F, where the debranching enzymes will help with starch solubility when you reach the lower saccharification range.

Just some thoughts if you want to pursue further.

Note:  Given that they are using brewers crystals (sugar) as part of their fermentables, you should be able to get by with a single infusion at low mash temperatures and rely on the champagne yeast to clean up longer dextrins.
« Last Edit: November 21, 2018, 09:40:31 AM by Oginme »
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Offline Kevin58

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Re: Rose` Recipes
« Reply #4 on: November 21, 2018, 09:37:53 AM »
What?  ??? I get currants from my local Kroger grocery store.
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Offline brewfun

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Re: Rose` Recipes
« Reply #5 on: November 25, 2018, 07:52:56 AM »
Surly Rose' is a take on the Brut IPA style. The style is only about a year old and has already morphed in both techniques and lore.

The main attribute is that it utilizes an enzyme in the fermenter. The goal is to make a balanced, bone dry, very pale, very clear IPA with somewhat low bitterness but high hop aromatics. This contrasts with East Coast IPA, which is, of course, fuller bodied, hazy, with low bitterness and high hop aromatics.

The use of Champagne yeast is superfluous. It's pretty neutral and doesn't consume anything more complex than maltose. It's been added for marketing because beer buyers intuitively think it should be there. A highly attenuation ale or lager yeast is sufficient.

The operative ingredient is amyloglucosidase, added to the fermenter and/or the mash. Either way, it will reduce dextrins more than beta amylase. In the fermenter, it seems to break down some hop oils, changing what you might expect from traditional dry hop aroma. This seems to be variety dependent, though.

My own experiments with Brut IPA began as a collaboration, where we used their grist and my hops from our respective best selling DIPAs. We used Brewers Clarex as well as amyloglucodasidase. The grist contained crystal and Munich malts. The end result was a very dry beer with very well defined specialty malt character, but none of the sweetness. The hops were a bit more citrussy, but less floral than expected. The final gravity was below zero, making a normally 8.2% beer into 9.7%.

Adding fermenter enzymes isn't anything new. "Dry" and "lite" beer brands have been doing it for decades. This is one of those cases where we adopt the technology of the big boys, but still curse their use of it.
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