Author Topic: Fruit Puree Questions  (Read 94 times)

Offline mr_beer

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Fruit Puree Questions
« on: November 05, 2018, 09:46:41 AM »
This post has been updated to reflect data from two suppliers.

I have access to many recipes that call for fruit measured in XX pounds of fruit, honey etc. 
Since I am in a rural part of the country (Arkansas) the notion of growing and harvesting these fruits does not work. 

I wanted some notion of what the contribution of fruit puree would be in terms of actual fruit itself when used in the recipe.  Most vendors consider this information proprietary but the following two vendors provided some general notions to start with.

R.W. Knudsen
The Knudson 'Just' line of products are organic and have no additives or preservatives.
  • Tart Cherry Puree = 1/3# of berries per 8 oz serving = 1.32 pounds of fruit per 32 oz bottle
  • Blueberry Puree = 1/2# of berries per 8 oz serving = 2.00 pounds of fruit per 32 oz bottle
  • Black Cherry Puree = 2/3# of berries per 8 oz serving = 2.67 pounds of fruit per 32 oz bottle.

Vintners Harvest
The Vintner Harvest distributor, BrewCraft USA, provided their general view?
  • For berries: if you use 100 lb of fruit, the equivalent amount of puree is 88 lb. = 1.13 ratio = 3.5 pounds of fruit equivalent per 49 oz can
  • For pitted fruits: if you use 100 lb of fruit, the equivalent amount of puree is 80 lb. = 1.25 ratio = 3.83 pounds of fruit equivalent per 49 oz can.
   

These amounts are approximate but represent a good starting for recipe conversion from actual fruit to a recipe using the puree.
« Last Edit: November 06, 2018, 02:54:15 PM by mr_beer »

Offline brewfun

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Re: Fruit Puree Questions
« Reply #1 on: November 06, 2018, 07:54:28 AM »
If you're working with a whole fruit puree, no sugar added, then the ratio is effectively 1:1. You can find out the weight percentage of pits or discarded seeds and factor that in, if you wish.

Jams and jellies have fruit added, so, I'd consult some recipes and figure the average percentage by weight of sugar added and factor that in. TBH, I don't use jams or jellies because of the pectins.

Juice or juice concentrate needs to be converted to it's properly diluted weight. In general, fruits like grapes and apples take about 20# to yield 1 gallon of fermented product.
Beer Appreciation is the space between pints.

 

modification