Author Topic: Foolproof NEIPA recipe require  (Read 2922 times)

Offline spook100

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Foolproof NEIPA recipe require
« on: June 07, 2018, 05:19:16 AM »
The home brewing community in the USA seems to be all a-buzz with NEIPA these days, however, I live in the UK and have yet to see one on this side of the pond. I want to find out what all the hype (and controversy) is about so the obvious solution, as a home brewer, is to make one myself. I don't want to brew something up and think "so that's what a NEIPA tastes like" if what I have made isn't actually a NEIPA. So, does anyone have a really straightforward recipe that will undoubtedly produce a NEIPA if properly followed? I brew on a GrainFather and store in Corny kegs.

Offline Oginme

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Re: Foolproof NEIPA recipe require
« Reply #1 on: June 09, 2018, 06:50:49 AM »
One of the problems with recommending a recipe that is a 'sure ringer' for a style is that everyone's process is a little different.  Years ago, I tested my processes by brewing the same recipe with three of my standard brewing set ups: 10 liter BIAB (full volume), 20 liter standard mash tun, and a 16 liter BIAB (with sparge).  The end result was subtle, but significant, differences between the three set ups which allowed me to make some adjustments to be able to move recipes from one system to another with a fairly good degree of confidence in repeating results.  [I should note that I had already been doing repeat brews on my 10 liter system and had great confidence in being able to repeat a recipe on that system]

This may be one of the reasons other people may be hesitant about posting a recipe for you. 

Nonetheless, I have attached my recipe for a basic NEIPA which should give you some indication of the style.   It is by far not a simple recipe and I had developed it over a few years by playing with hop addition methods in other recipes.  My personal take on this recipe is that it is a fairly good representation of style, needs a bit more tweaking for my taste, and takes a bit of attention to repeat, especially given the layering of hops in whirlpool and fermenter.

I have not added my notes to the recipe but will provide them here for you.

(1)  Add whirlpool hops at 195F, 180F and 160F. I have tried to put the times in as I have seen the temperature drop in my 10 liter system, but consider the first two add times as approximate and then chill quickly 10 minutes following the last whirlpool hop addition.

(2)  The first dry hop addition is critical to obtaining a lasting haze.  It should be added 16 hrs to 10 hrs once the first signs of airlock activity has been seen in the carboy.  I typically, 'proof' my yeast by adding my sample taken for gravity measurement to the decanted starter flask and allowing that to start showing signs of activity before pitching it into the chilled wort. 

(3) Due to the amount of oats in the recipe, it tends to oxidize and darken quickly, so I carbonate in a keg with sugar to allow the yeast to scavenge oxygen from the transfer from carboy to keg.

(4) Flocculating the wort and cold crashing the carboy are, IMHO, important to developing a stable haze.  The haze should be derived from the hop polyphenols and the presence of large amounts of proteins in the beer once it is transferred will result in it clearing pretty dramatically.  I try to drive the bulk of the longer chain proteins out of solution so that the resultant beer is a bit more stable in appearance.  It is my belief from the recipes I made building up to this one that the 'milk shake' IPAs still have much of these proteins in solution and tend not to be stable.  As I live in New England near where the crossroads of Trillium, Tree House, The Alchemist, and Farmhouse meet, I've seen the style representatives up close and personal.

(5) If you cannot get WY1318, then I would suggest a standard English ale yeast.  Yeasts for standard American style IPAs just do not cut it for this style of ale: too clean. 

Good luck and feel free to ask questions!

 

« Last Edit: June 09, 2018, 08:09:47 AM by Oginme »
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Offline Rodent

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Re: Foolproof NEIPA recipe require
« Reply #2 on: June 09, 2018, 09:30:15 AM »
Quote
Due to the amount of oats in the recipe, it tends to oxidize and darken quickly, so I carbonate in a keg with sugar to allow the yeast to scavenge oxygen from the transfer from carboy to keg.

 this is a great nugget of advice I will utilize on my next NEIPA
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