Author Topic: Molasses as a priming sugar  (Read 134 times)

Offline rscogins

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Molasses as a priming sugar
« on: December 07, 2017, 08:41:36 AM »
Has anyone tried using molasses as a priming sugar?

Offline Ck27

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Re: Molasses as a priming sugar
« Reply #1 on: December 07, 2017, 02:47:16 PM »
Has anyone tried using molasses as a priming sugar?

It might be a bit thick to use, typically Corn sugar or Dry Malt Extract are used although honey could be used as well.

Avoid anything like table sugar or cane sugar will leave a bad taste in beer.

Offline Oginme

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Re: Molasses as a priming sugar
« Reply #2 on: December 07, 2017, 03:08:02 PM »
I've used molasses in the past to carbonate in recipes where I already have molasses added for flavor.  There is just not enough added for carbonation to really give any residual flavor, so I usually stick to table sugar for carbonation.  It is cheap, easy to get, and ferments out completely. 

If you do try molasses, you can stick it in the microwave for a few seconds to warm it slightly to reduce the viscosity and allow it to pour a bit easier.

Recycle your grains, feed them to a goat!

Offline Ck27

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Re: Molasses as a priming sugar
« Reply #3 on: December 07, 2017, 03:49:32 PM »
I've used molasses in the past to carbonate in recipes where I already have molasses added for flavor.  There is just not enough added for carbonation to really give any residual flavor, so I usually stick to table sugar for carbonation.  It is cheap, easy to get, and ferments out completely. 

If you do try molasses, you can stick it in the microwave for a few seconds to warm it slightly to reduce the viscosity and allow it to pour a bit easier.

 Table sugar unless it's dextrose won't ferment out completely only dextrose will and that's what many people have told me including a guy who brews and is a registered beer judge.

So correct me if I'm wrong but I have always been told otherwise.

Offline BOB357

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Re: Molasses as a priming sugar
« Reply #4 on: December 07, 2017, 04:12:38 PM »
I've used molasses in the past to carbonate in recipes where I already have molasses added for flavor.  There is just not enough added for carbonation to really give any residual flavor, so I usually stick to table sugar for carbonation.  It is cheap, easy to get, and ferments out completely. 

If you do try molasses, you can stick it in the microwave for a few seconds to warm it slightly to reduce the viscosity and allow it to pour a bit easier.

 Table sugar unless it's dextrose won't ferment out completely only dextrose will and that's what many people have told me including a guy who brews and is a registered beer judge.

So correct me if I'm wrong but I have always been told otherwise.

You're wrong :)
Bob

Offline Oginme

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Re: Molasses as a priming sugar
« Reply #5 on: December 07, 2017, 04:47:02 PM »
Dextrose is a simple sugar (one C6H12O6 ring) vs. Sucrose which is a double ring sugar (C12H22O11) composed of a Dextrose ring and a fructose ring.  Yeast produce an enzyme which hydrates the sucrose, splitting it into Dextrose and Fructose simple sugars which are both completely digestible by the yeast. 
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Offline Ck27

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Re: Molasses as a priming sugar
« Reply #6 on: December 07, 2017, 07:00:57 PM »
Dextrose is a simple sugar (one C6H12O6 ring) vs. Sucrose which is a double ring sugar (C12H22O11) composed of a Dextrose ring and a fructose ring.  Yeast produce an enzyme which hydrates the sucrose, splitting it into Dextrose and Fructose simple sugars which are both completely digestible by the yeast.

Well I wouldn't have known I don't pay much attention to it I just use dextrose it's $0.50 a pound. Best bang for your buck here at least.