Author Topic: Quick question about Belgian beer I'm brewing  (Read 127 times)

Offline Ck27

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Quick question about Belgian beer I'm brewing
« on: November 14, 2017, 09:53:41 PM »
So I'm brewing my first Belgian it's been 12 days and I took hydrometer sample it said 1.012 and my OG was 1.085. Beer still has bubbling brown krausen about a inch thick but tastes done, how much longer should I wait I'm using White Labs Abbey ale and White Labs Belgian Golden strains and I don't want to get off flavors from yeast consuming dead yeast but I don't know if this beer is done.

I should mention the beer fermented like mad for one day then had basically shown 0 airlock activity until I moved it today, Beer has fermented around 70-75F for most of the 12 days. So it should have been too cold.

I tried a bit it has a bit of a weird aroma, almost like green apples which I know is a sign its not done yet, and the alcohol doesn't really taste like its done as well its quite noticeable but just doesn't taste right and its not a infection I did use honey but can tell you from the krausen that the beer is still fermenting.

Thanks
« Last Edit: November 14, 2017, 10:09:40 PM by Ck27 »

Offline GigaFemto

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Re: Quick question about Belgian beer I'm brewing
« Reply #1 on: November 15, 2017, 01:35:24 AM »
If it has thick krausen and is still bubbling then it isn't done. The general rule is to wait until the gravity is the same for 3 days in a row. You shouldn't get off flavors from dead yeast unless  you let the beer sit on the yeast for many weeks, so you have a lot of margin still.

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Offline Ck27

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Re: Quick question about Belgian beer I'm brewing
« Reply #2 on: November 15, 2017, 02:16:36 AM »
If it has thick krausen and is still bubbling then it isn't done. The general rule is to wait until the gravity is the same for 3 days in a row. You shouldn't get off flavors from dead yeast unless  you let the beer sit on the yeast for many weeks, so you have a lot of margin still.

--GF

Gravity hasn't moved in over 6 days. It is bizzarw because it tastes fine but smells mildly like Apple's and a weird floral smell kinda like a rose it's weird. I haven't used Belgian yeast untill now so I have no clue what's normal and what's not when it comes to belgians
« Last Edit: November 15, 2017, 02:22:53 AM by Ck27 »

Offline Oginme

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Re: Quick question about Belgian beer I'm brewing
« Reply #3 on: November 15, 2017, 05:43:18 AM »
What was your OG and how much simple sugars were in the recipe?  When were the sugars added to the fermenter?

If you have a good amount of simple sugars in your recipe from the beginning of fermentation, then the yeast will preferentially digest those first.  Newer generations of yeast which have been formed will have less ability to produce the enzymes needed to reduce more complex sugars, such as maltose, into simpler forms, such as fructose and glucose, for the yeasts to digest.  This can cause a stalling of the fermentation and prevent the yeasts from cleaning up any by-products they have produced during the real active early stages of fermentation.  A 'green apple' odor is usually caused by acetaldehyde, which is a product formed from the Krebs cycle and would normally be consumed (back into the Krebs cycle) by the yeast as the simple sugar concentration goes down. 

I would recommend drawing out a sample and tasting it.  If it is overly sweet, then you may need to add a small pitch of active yeast to reengage the fermentation.  I have done this one, on one of my first Belgians, by dissolving just a bit of DME into a few hundred cc's of water, boiling and chilling and then adding a bit of yeast.  I waited until the yeast started fermenting the starter wort and then pitched it into the fermenter.  Within a couple of days the gravity went from 1.024 down to 1.010 where it should have finished.

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Offline Ck27

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Re: Quick question about Belgian beer I'm brewing
« Reply #4 on: November 15, 2017, 10:09:24 AM »
What was your OG and how much simple sugars were the recipe?  When were the sugars added to the fermenter?

If you have a good amount of simple sugars in your recipe from the beginning of fermentation, then the yeast will preferentially digest those first.  Newer generations of yeast which have been formed will have less ability to produce the enzymes needed to reduce more complex sugars, such as maltose, into simpler forms, such as fructose and glucose, for the yeasts to digest.  This can cause a stalling of the fermentation and prevent the yeasts from cleaning up any by-products they have produced during the real active early stages of fermentation.  A 'green apple' odor is usually caused by acetaldehyde, which is a product formed from the Krebs cycle and would normally be consumed (back into the Krebs cycle) by the yeast as the simple sugar concentration goes down. 

I would recommend drawing out a sample and tasting it.  If it is overly sweet, then you may need to add a small pitch of active yeast to reengage the fermentation.  I have done this one, on one of my first Belgians, by dissolving just a bit of DME into a few hundred cc's of water, boiling and chilling and then adding a bit of yeast.  I waited until the yeast started fermenting the starter wort and then pitched it into the fermenter.  Within a couple of days the gravity went from 1.024 down to 1.010 where it should have finished.
I listed OG above, it was mildly sweet. So most of sugars fermented out.

 

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