Author Topic: williamette / Chinook / Cascade  (Read 627 times)

Offline MRMARTINSALES

  • BeerSmith Master Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 80
  • Karma: 0
  • BeerSmith 2 Rocks!
williamette / Chinook / Cascade
« on: September 13, 2017, 07:13:03 AM »
Hi,

With a pack of each of the above hops what would peoples ideal hop schedule be here.

I'm wanting to develop a pale ale with a powerful aroma and taste of hops but keep the bitterness low.

I was thinking of obtaining my bitterness thorugh an addition of Chinook at the start and then dry hopping the beer with all three at the end. So only really boiling the Chinook for the bitterness only.

Any thoughts on that OR anyone tried it before

Thanks

Offline Ck27

  • BeerSmith Grandmaster Brewer
  • *****
  • Posts: 263
  • Karma: -7
  • BeerSmith's Unofficial Spam Police.... Do Not Spam
Re: williamette / Chinook / Cascade
« Reply #1 on: September 13, 2017, 11:19:06 AM »
Hi,

With a pack of each of the above hops what would peoples ideal hop schedule be here.

I'm wanting to develop a pale ale with a powerful aroma and taste of hops but keep the bitterness low.

I was thinking of obtaining my bitterness thorugh an addition of Chinook at the start and then dry hopping the beer with all three at the end. So only really boiling the Chinook for the bitterness only.

Any thoughts on that OR anyone tried it before

Thanks

Boiling for 15 minutes down to flame out with a couple additions would keep bitterness low and pack tons of flavor.

:)

Offline MRMARTINSALES

  • BeerSmith Master Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 80
  • Karma: 0
  • BeerSmith 2 Rocks!
Re: williamette / Chinook / Cascade
« Reply #2 on: September 13, 2017, 11:46:53 AM »
Thanks. So does that mean put the first hops in at 15 minutes and add from there? Would you suggest dry hopping? And if I'm making a 30litre batch any ideas on quantities?

Thanks for all your help

Offline Ck27

  • BeerSmith Grandmaster Brewer
  • *****
  • Posts: 263
  • Karma: -7
  • BeerSmith's Unofficial Spam Police.... Do Not Spam
Re: williamette / Chinook / Cascade
« Reply #3 on: September 13, 2017, 01:27:42 PM »
Thanks. So does that mean put the first hops in at 15 minutes and add from there? Would you suggest dry hopping? And if I'm making a 30litre batch any ideas on quantities?

Thanks for all your help

Yeah, That's what I mean, and as to dry hopping wait until after the krausen falls because if you don't the flavors will get nuked by the fermentation. And will not be as good as if you started dry hopping after say 4-6 days.

Offline MRMARTINSALES

  • BeerSmith Master Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 80
  • Karma: 0
  • BeerSmith 2 Rocks!
Re: williamette / Chinook / Cascade
« Reply #4 on: September 14, 2017, 12:48:54 AM »
Thanks CK27 your advice is most welcome.

Offline Ck27

  • BeerSmith Grandmaster Brewer
  • *****
  • Posts: 263
  • Karma: -7
  • BeerSmith's Unofficial Spam Police.... Do Not Spam
Re: williamette / Chinook / Cascade
« Reply #5 on: September 14, 2017, 01:33:34 AM »
Thanks CK27 your advice is most welcome.

No problem, let me know how it turns out. I guess you could say that I have some experience with pale ales or lagers with a lot of hops and low bitterness, I have a pilsner going right now that has 7 different hops and only 36 IBUS which is not that many, bitterness is going to be extremely low but its going to pack a lot of flavor. Ive got Nothern Brewer, Tettnang,Spalt,Hallertau,saaz and a couple more that escape my memory right now. All are low bitterness hops for the most part.
« Last Edit: September 14, 2017, 01:36:22 AM by Ck27 »

Offline MRMARTINSALES

  • BeerSmith Master Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 80
  • Karma: 0
  • BeerSmith 2 Rocks!
Re: williamette / Chinook / Cascade
« Reply #6 on: September 14, 2017, 02:20:58 AM »
Based on your experience then, how do you determine the quantities of each hop? Obviously it's based on the bitterness as that needs to be right but the IBUs can be made up with different amounts of quantities of different hops. I just wondered what should be considered with the quantities

Offline Ck27

  • BeerSmith Grandmaster Brewer
  • *****
  • Posts: 263
  • Karma: -7
  • BeerSmith's Unofficial Spam Police.... Do Not Spam
Re: williamette / Chinook / Cascade
« Reply #7 on: September 14, 2017, 02:44:30 AM »
Based on your experience then, how do you determine the quantities of each hop? Obviously it's based on the bitterness as that needs to be right but the IBUs can be made up with different amounts of quantities of different hops. I just wondered what should be considered with the quantities

It's really down to what hop flavor do you want most?? And divvy up the flavor and ibus. And get both the correct bitterness and what flavors you want. I was going for a earthy,floral slightly spicy but hoppy pilsner. I wanted to taste the hops instead of making it  extremely mild so a lot of my hops were done at the end

Offline Oginme

  • BeerSmith Grandmaster Brewer
  • *****
  • Posts: 1277
  • Karma: 61
  • Goats, guitars, and a home brew; Life is good!
    • Longvu LaManchas
Re: williamette / Chinook / Cascade
« Reply #8 on: September 14, 2017, 05:38:35 AM »
One of the fun things to do with BeerSmith is to plug in the hops and then play with the amount and timing of the additions to see the impact on IBU.  As for a target IBU, I took a brewed APA and compared it to bitterness with several commercial examples of similar published IBU.  This helped calibrate my expectation from my process with what the real world produces.
Recycle your grains, feed them to a goat!

Offline MRMARTINSALES

  • BeerSmith Master Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 80
  • Karma: 0
  • BeerSmith 2 Rocks!
Re: williamette / Chinook / Cascade
« Reply #9 on: September 14, 2017, 08:43:02 AM »
Hi OGINME, thanks for the post.

That's exactly what I try to do I have no problem calculating the IBU my trouble comes with deciding which hops to put more of in. And at what time? I guess its about knowing what taste and aroma you want and go from there

Offline Oginme

  • BeerSmith Grandmaster Brewer
  • *****
  • Posts: 1277
  • Karma: 61
  • Goats, guitars, and a home brew; Life is good!
    • Longvu LaManchas
Re: williamette / Chinook / Cascade
« Reply #10 on: September 14, 2017, 10:16:22 AM »
I guess its about knowing what taste and aroma you want and go from there

This is it exactly.  Read the aroma and taste profiles of the hops and decide which you want to stand out, which are dominant and which will help fill out the flavors and aromas.  Then, generally, use your bittering hops early, flavor hops for near the end of the boil and the aroma hops for whirlpool or dry hopping.  There are a lot of cross over effects so it is never quite clean and crisp.  That is where trial and error comes in.  I always brew with the idea that I will be re-brewing some version of the recipe at a future date to get the flavors and aromas just where I want them. 

Most of all you need to have some idea of what you will expect from your recipe, write it down and then do an honest tasting once it is ready.  Compare your notes from the development to your tasting notes and decide if or what changes you would like to make.  As you go along, you will get a better feeling for the hops you use and what you will get out of them.

And then... Someone will come up with a new way to add hops to get better flavors/aromas out of them, new hops will appear that fit what you are looking for, and/or you will decide to take the recipe in another direction, and the fun will begin all over again.
Recycle your grains, feed them to a goat!

Offline Ck27

  • BeerSmith Grandmaster Brewer
  • *****
  • Posts: 263
  • Karma: -7
  • BeerSmith's Unofficial Spam Police.... Do Not Spam
Re: williamette / Chinook / Cascade
« Reply #11 on: September 14, 2017, 12:22:41 PM »
I guess its about knowing what taste and aroma you want and go from there

This is it exactly.  Read the aroma and taste profiles of the hops and decide which you want to stand out, which are dominant and which will help fill out the flavors and aromas.  Then, generally, use your bittering hops early, flavor hops for near the end of the boil and the aroma hops for whirlpool or dry hopping.  There are a lot of cross over effects so it is never quite clean and crisp.  That is where trial and error comes in.  I always brew with the idea that I will be re-brewing some version of the recipe at a future date to get the flavors and aromas just where I want them. 

Most of all you need to have some idea of what you will expect from your recipe, write it down and then do an honest tasting once it is ready.  Compare your notes from the development to your tasting notes and decide if or what changes you would like to make.  As you go along, you will get a better feeling for the hops you use and what you will get out of them.

And then... Someone will come up with a new way to add hops to get better flavors/aromas out of them, new hops will appear that fit what you are looking for, and/or you will decide to take the recipe in another direction, and the fun will begin all over again.

Yep

 

modification