Author Topic: Is my beer infected?  (Read 11388 times)

Offline Nickw

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Re: Is my beer infected?
« Reply #15 on: December 05, 2015, 10:50:13 AM »
Okay, so you saying I must pasteurise it and put it into a new fermenter?  is it still very important not to oxidize your beer during pasteurisation?

Offline Nickw

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Re: Is my beer infected?
« Reply #16 on: December 05, 2015, 10:58:10 AM »
Ha okay so I just went and had a look at the beer, that whole bubbly layer that was there previously is gone and there are only a few specs of that white stuff left ion top of the beer? looks like the rest has settled. I will see what it looks like tomorrow morning and take photos and post. Is it normal for that to happen and that layer of infection to completely disappear??

Offline Nickw

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Re: Is my beer infected?
« Reply #17 on: December 05, 2015, 11:05:40 AM »
Also just took a gravity reading and it dropped down to 1.016 in the last 2 days, about 4 days ago I moved the fermenter into the coolest room in the house, so my beer temp has probably dropped around 5 degrees C. Maybe the lager yeast was making my beer go weird? Still smells and tastes fine as well.

Offline Scott Ickes

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Re: Is my beer infected?
« Reply #18 on: December 05, 2015, 12:33:50 PM »
Moving a beer with a pellicle could disturb it and make it fall down to the bottom.  If it was infected, it is still infected.
Kegs:
 Red IPA
 ESB
 Saison Solera
 Dubel (Aged in Malbec Wine Barrel
Aging:
 80 Shilling (In bourbon barrel)
Bottled
 Peppermint Patty Stout
 Wee Heavy

Scott Ickes
https://creativebrewing.wordpress.com

Offline Maine Homebrewer

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Re: Is my beer infected?
« Reply #19 on: December 05, 2015, 01:27:15 PM »
Quote
If it was infected, it is still infected.

Yep. Bottle it as is and you'll get gushers.
"To alcohol! The cause of - and solution to - all of life's problems!" -Homer Simpson

Offline Scott Ickes

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Re: Is my beer infected?
« Reply #20 on: December 05, 2015, 02:00:19 PM »
Also just took a gravity reading and it dropped down to 1.016 in the last 2 days, about 4 days ago I moved the fermenter into the coolest room in the house, so my beer temp has probably dropped around 5 degrees C. Maybe the lager yeast was making my beer go weird? Still smells and tastes fine as well.

I made a ten gallon batch of a light version of Oud Bruin.  Basically, I dialed back the malt and hops.  My Original Gravity was 1.060 and my IBU's were 6.9.  I made the batch for blending with other beers.  I split it into two 5-gallon batches.  I pitched Roselaire Yeast Blend into one and in the other I pitched Lactobacillus Brevis, as well as the dregs from two bottles of Jolly Pumpkin LaRoja. 

Both batches formed a pellicle within three weeks.  The Lacto/Jolly Pumpkin batch started souring within a month of brew day.  The Roselaire batch was only a little farmyardy at six months, and wasn't sour.  At 13 months, the Lacto/Jolly Pumpkin batch was puckeringly sour, so I used it for blending three other beers.

The Roselaire Batch at 13 months, was just starting to get sour, but was very one dimensional.

Currently (19 months after brew day), the blends are doing nicely and getting very complex.  They are still in fermenters getting happier.

The Roselaire Batch is now a sweet tart sour bomb, but it was a much slower process than the Lacto/Jolly Pumpkin batch.

My point is that you may not notice much sourness or farmyard yet, but it "WILL" happen.  The point that "Maine" is making, is that you don't want it to happen in the bottles!  You want it to happen in the fermenters and you want it to run it's course and let the microbes use up all of the food that they can eat.

If this were my brew, I would just let it sit and get happy.

If you throw it out, you throw away $30 worth of ingredients.  If you let it sit, go out and purchase another fermenter, so that you don't reduce your fermentation capacity by tying up one of your fermenters.  That way, you can make clean beers still and 2 years from now you may end up bottling the best accidental beer you ever made.

Have patience!
Kegs:
 Red IPA
 ESB
 Saison Solera
 Dubel (Aged in Malbec Wine Barrel
Aging:
 80 Shilling (In bourbon barrel)
Bottled
 Peppermint Patty Stout
 Wee Heavy

Scott Ickes
https://creativebrewing.wordpress.com

Offline Maine Homebrewer

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Re: Is my beer infected?
« Reply #21 on: December 05, 2015, 04:20:14 PM »
I'd go with Scott's post #14. Like I said, the gushers I bottled with what looked like the same thing growing in the carboy didn't have an off taste. Had I pasteurized and pitched some new yeast, the batch may have been saved.   

Scott: When you say "sour beer," what are you talking about exactly? I liked the commercial lambics that I have tried, but never thought about making one. Is that what you mean?  I really like the fruit ones. What I have read about the process has made it seem intimidating, but then again I could have said the same thing about all-grain at one time. A homemade raspberry lambic. That could be good.

"To alcohol! The cause of - and solution to - all of life's problems!" -Homer Simpson

Offline Scott Ickes

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Re: Is my beer infected?
« Reply #22 on: December 05, 2015, 05:08:23 PM »
I'm make Flanders style (Red's and Browns), soured Abbey style and Soured Saisons. 
Kegs:
 Red IPA
 ESB
 Saison Solera
 Dubel (Aged in Malbec Wine Barrel
Aging:
 80 Shilling (In bourbon barrel)
Bottled
 Peppermint Patty Stout
 Wee Heavy

Scott Ickes
https://creativebrewing.wordpress.com

Offline Nickw

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Re: Is my beer infected?
« Reply #23 on: December 06, 2015, 01:48:46 AM »
Oki dokes, I will go with what Scott said and pasteurize, just have to order some yeast so will be here in a few days, going to try find that champagne yeast you suggested. Not sure if the online stores here in SA will have it though. I am hoping the beer will get to the expected FG in a few days, happy it has dropped some more.
If I reach the expected FG and it doesn't drop anymore after that can I bottle straight after pasteurizing even if the beer is super cloudy still?

Offline Scott Ickes

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Re: Is my beer infected?
« Reply #24 on: December 06, 2015, 02:04:41 AM »
Be patient!  Let it clear.  In brewing, never be in a rush.
Kegs:
 Red IPA
 ESB
 Saison Solera
 Dubel (Aged in Malbec Wine Barrel
Aging:
 80 Shilling (In bourbon barrel)
Bottled
 Peppermint Patty Stout
 Wee Heavy

Scott Ickes
https://creativebrewing.wordpress.com

KellerBrauer

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Re: Is my beer infected?
« Reply #25 on: December 15, 2015, 06:09:44 PM »
I went ahead and bottled my infected brew and the pellicle went away as per my previous post.  Also, this brew is outstanding with NO gushers.

If its not too late, try treating half your batch as it has been suggested in this thread and go ahead and simply bottle and cold crash the other half.  This would be a great experiment and please let us know how your efforts came out regardless of the method you used.

Good luck!