Author Topic: testing yeast after harvesting  (Read 12762 times)

Offline Damrite

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Re: testing yeast after harvesting
« Reply #15 on: April 12, 2014, 02:40:57 PM »
Oh great thanks

Offline Damrite

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Re: testing yeast after harvesting
« Reply #16 on: April 12, 2014, 10:12:29 PM »
I sure hope so  ;)

Offline Freak

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Re: testing yeast after harvesting
« Reply #17 on: April 12, 2014, 10:12:47 PM »
I know it's too late to do this now but, for future reference, brew the same day you rack from the primary and, toss it right in. This is assuming you are brewing a similar style of beer that requires that type of yeast. I don't like to hold yeast if I don't have to. You can re-pitch that yeast over and over. I have done this I believe 9 times. It was a bunch. We just got tired of making things that require 1056.
Brewing massive amounts of freakin' good beer since 1991. We had to learn the hard way. No homebrew stores or beer nerds (like me) to talk to back then. Just pure passion and determination. Relax, Don't Worry, Have A Homebrew! -23 Karma! Yee Ha!! It went up! Smite me if you must but, trust me.

Offline Damrite

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Re: testing yeast after harvesting
« Reply #18 on: April 12, 2014, 10:21:17 PM »
Not sure if I understand, you still go thru the harvesting or you just reuse the yeast cake?

Offline Freak

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Re: testing yeast after harvesting
« Reply #19 on: April 12, 2014, 10:39:08 PM »
Just pull it off the bottom of the previous batch and pitch it right into the new batch. Sanitize some sort of container (with boiling water or Star San) and collect the yeast. Then toss it in the new batch.
Brewing massive amounts of freakin' good beer since 1991. We had to learn the hard way. No homebrew stores or beer nerds (like me) to talk to back then. Just pure passion and determination. Relax, Don't Worry, Have A Homebrew! -23 Karma! Yee Ha!! It went up! Smite me if you must but, trust me.

Offline Scott Ickes

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Re: testing yeast after harvesting
« Reply #20 on: April 12, 2014, 11:34:42 PM »
Freak's correct.  I don't even pull it out of fermenter.  I'll rack the beer that's in the primary into a carboy and then leave the yeast where it is in that fermentor.  I'll then rack the beer I'm brewing right on top of the yeast cake and put the airlock back on it.

Kegs:
 Red IPA
 ESB
 Saison Solera
 Dubel (Aged in Malbec Wine Barrel
Aging:
 80 Shilling (In bourbon barrel)
Bottled
 Peppermint Patty Stout
 Wee Heavy

Scott Ickes
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Offline Freak

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Re: testing yeast after harvesting
« Reply #21 on: April 13, 2014, 01:24:10 AM »
Scott has a great idea there. Just leave the yeast in your carboy or bucket. Drop the new wort right in on top of it. I can't do that with my equipment but, when I did use carboys I never thought to do that. Good call Scott.
Brewing massive amounts of freakin' good beer since 1991. We had to learn the hard way. No homebrew stores or beer nerds (like me) to talk to back then. Just pure passion and determination. Relax, Don't Worry, Have A Homebrew! -23 Karma! Yee Ha!! It went up! Smite me if you must but, trust me.

Offline Damrite

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Re: testing yeast after harvesting
« Reply #22 on: April 13, 2014, 09:26:30 AM »
I will know for the next time, I did,nt know I could do that, great idea

but for now when you harvest the yeast do you guys pitch in same quantity as the original vial?

KernelCrush

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Re: testing yeast after harvesting
« Reply #23 on: April 13, 2014, 10:37:28 AM »
Dam! there will be other opinions on this.

Offline Damrite

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Re: testing yeast after harvesting
« Reply #24 on: April 13, 2014, 01:36:11 PM »
 Hey Freak every time I ask a question here, it cross my mind, I know that people like you had to learn the hard way, and you guys are the  only one to blame for developing this passion of brewing, my wife hates you all  ;)
But I thanks all of you

Offline Damrite

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Re: testing yeast after harvesting
« Reply #25 on: April 13, 2014, 02:31:54 PM »
Anybody can help on one question ASAP please.
 when you harvest the yeast do you guys pitch in same quantity as the original vial? Or I pitch more for a 5 gal batch... thanks

Offline Scott Ickes

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Re: testing yeast after harvesting
« Reply #26 on: April 13, 2014, 09:25:32 PM »
Dam! there will be other opinions on this.

You are correct. 

Advantages to pitching onto a yeast cake:
  Less lag time.
  You're definitely not underpitching.
  Strong primary fermentation.

Disadvantages:
   The trub from the previous beer is mixed in with the yeast cake.
   You're probably overpitching.

Kegs:
 Red IPA
 ESB
 Saison Solera
 Dubel (Aged in Malbec Wine Barrel
Aging:
 80 Shilling (In bourbon barrel)
Bottled
 Peppermint Patty Stout
 Wee Heavy

Scott Ickes
https://creativebrewing.wordpress.com

Offline tom_hampton

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Re: testing yeast after harvesting
« Reply #27 on: April 13, 2014, 09:52:56 PM »
Dam! there will be other opinions on this.

You are correct. 

Advantages to pitching onto a yeast cake:
  Less lag time.
  You're definitely not underpitching.
  Strong primary fermentation.

Disadvantages:
   The trub from the previous beer is mixed in with the yeast cake.
   You're probably overpitching.

Probably?  Average growth is 4x during primary fermentation.  So, unless you are pitching a barleywine onto a small 9pplato beer... It's definitely overpitching.

R.I.P.:Belgian Blonde
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Offline Scott Ickes

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Re: testing yeast after harvesting
« Reply #28 on: April 13, 2014, 10:13:35 PM »
Dam! there will be other opinions on this.

You are correct. 

Advantages to pitching onto a yeast cake:
  Less lag time.
  You're definitely not underpitching.
  Strong primary fermentation.

Disadvantages:
   The trub from the previous beer is mixed in with the yeast cake.
   You're probably overpitching.

Probably?  Average growth is 4x during primary fermentation.  So, unless you are pitching a barleywine onto a small 9pplato beer... It's definitely overpitching.

I only consider pitching onto a yeast cake when I'm making something with a 1.090 SG or higher.  Usually it's at 1.100 or higher in reality.  So, it's usually only on a Barley Wine as you suggested or a huge RIS.  Those are the two types of beer that I make that are that high.  Although, I haven't made a Barley Wine in a few years.  I make 4 to 6 batches a year that are of that high of a gravity. 

Looking back through my brew records, I made RIS in the last year that had starting gravities of 1.084, 1.142 and 1.091. 
   >The 1.084 was a smack pack that was stepped up to get the appropriate yeast count. 
   >I then pitched the 1.142 onto that yeast cake. 
   >I made a 1.095 Scottish Ale recently and it was harvested yeast with the proper starter. 
   >The 1.091 was also harvested yeast with the proper starter size. 
   >I also made a 10 gallon batch of Belgian Strong that was at 1.082 this past year, but that was also a smack pack and appropriate
            starter.  I stepped this one up twice, so that I had enough yeast so that I could split the starter between two primary
            fermenters.  I don't have a large enough fermenter to hold an entire 10 gallon batch.

Looking back over the last year, I only pitched onto one yeast cake and I probably didn't overpitch, since it was the huge 1.142 RIS (Tootsie Roll).
Kegs:
 Red IPA
 ESB
 Saison Solera
 Dubel (Aged in Malbec Wine Barrel
Aging:
 80 Shilling (In bourbon barrel)
Bottled
 Peppermint Patty Stout
 Wee Heavy

Scott Ickes
https://creativebrewing.wordpress.com

KernelCrush

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Re: testing yeast after harvesting
« Reply #29 on: April 14, 2014, 03:41:31 AM »
Quote
when you harvest the yeast do you guys pitch in same quantity as the original vial?

Dam.  It depends on volume, og, harvest density, viability, etc.  You can use http://www.yeastcalc.co/homebrew-calculators

 

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