Author Topic: yeast starters  (Read 5533 times)

midas

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yeast starters
« on: January 13, 2007, 10:53:53 AM »
i'm fairly new to brewing,when and why would you use a yeast starter?   



                                                midas

FrugalBrewer

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Re: yeast starters
« Reply #1 on: January 13, 2007, 02:41:01 PM »
A starter is always a good idea to improve upon or prove viability but not necessarily, necessary.

A few reasons why to make one;

1.) Test viability
2.) Pepare yeast for higher gravity beers (1.065 or higher)
3.) To ranch a cleaner colony.
4.) Improve cell count.
5.) Reduce lag time pre-fermentation.

IMO, there is no reason to not do a starter.

davidliles

  • Guest
Re: yeast starters
« Reply #2 on: January 16, 2007, 08:40:04 AM »
I also agree. Since I started using yeast starters I've noticed fermentation observable almost immediately (within a couple hours). Before I would use White Labs yeast tubes and sometimes it would be 24+ hours before I would see signs of fermentation.

Also keep in mind that pitching temperature will also contribute to any lag in fermenting.

-David
www.kcbrewcrew.org

Dr Malt

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Re: yeast starters
« Reply #3 on: January 16, 2007, 04:39:57 PM »
I agree with the use of a starter for all the reasons given FrugalBrewer. A starter gives you a higher cell count into your wort or a higher pitch rate. This results in the faster start to fermentation and better tasting beer. So the answer to your "when" is all the time and the why has been addressed.

Dr Malt

Offline bonjour

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Re: yeast starters
« Reply #4 on: January 18, 2007, 02:57:34 PM »
Adding to Frugal's list

Quote
A few reasons why to make one;

1.) Test viability
2.) Pepare yeast for higher gravity beers (1.065 or higher)
3.) To ranch a cleaner colony.
4.) Improve cell count.
5.) Reduce lag time pre-fermentation.

6.) Increasing cell count decreases fusel alcohol production

deerelk4x4

  • Guest
Re: yeast starters
« Reply #5 on: January 19, 2007, 08:50:22 PM »
How would one do a yeast starter and how is it maintained?  I am under the current assumption that it is similar to a sour dough starter.  Please correct me if I am wrong.  Also, how do you cultivate the yeast used from a fermentor for future use?

FrugalBrewer

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Re: yeast starters
« Reply #6 on: January 20, 2007, 01:23:08 PM »
How would one do a yeast starter and how is it maintained?  I am under the current assumption that it is similar to a sour dough starter.  Please correct me if I am wrong.  Also, how do you cultivate the yeast used from a fermentor for future use?

Question #1:

Make a 1 to 2 pint, 1.020 to 1.040 OG(preffered) DME wort, chill to pitching temp, pitch yeast, cover loosely with aluminum foil ar use a stopper and airlock. Resuspend yeast via swirling everytime you think of your starter. Note: It is best to make the starter 1 to 2 days prior to brew day.

Pitch the yeast into your beer wort after decanting the starter beer off the yeast.

Question #2:

It s best to harvest or ranch the yeast from a primary fermentation although it can also be done from the secondary. The caveat to ranching from the secondary is the yeast is typically less flocculant. For detailed information on ranching read Papazian or Palmer or visit

http://www.wyeastlab.com/hbrew/hbyewash.htm

Prosit!

limbo696

  • Guest
Re: yeast starters
« Reply #7 on: April 12, 2007, 09:01:17 AM »
Another primary reason for doing a starter is if you brew more than five gallons of beer--the XL Wyeast smackpacks and Whitelab tubes have enough yeast for five gallons (but not really more) ** IF ** they are less than a few months old.  Yeasts quickly start to loose viability after their date of birth.

I agree than any basic brewing book that is worthwhile should have a detailed discussion about yeast starters.  Also, the most recent issue of Zymurgy (March/April) has a dedicated cover article on starters.  I ordered a copy from AHA for cover price ($6.00) plus $1.50 shipping.  The author, Jamil Zainasheff, also has a dedicated website to determine if you are pitching enough yeast into your wort which I have found to be invaluable:  http://www.mrmalty.com/ .

deerelk4x4

  • Guest
Re: yeast starters
« Reply #8 on: May 05, 2007, 11:20:35 PM »
Than ks for the pointers.  I will be checking them out now that I am back from my trip I was sent on by my JOB.  I hate that swear word.  Anyway, I look forward to any other pointers or information regarding yeast starters.